Google Seeks Patent on Chinese Spell Check Program

GoogleCNSpellPatAppA patent application, published on January 31, shows Google is continuing to develop for the Chinese market. The application discloses a program for spell checking non-Roman character based languages, such as Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Although the summary of the invention section provides that the program may cover any non-Roman based language, the dependent claims show the application is focused on the Chinese language.

The program identifies potentially incorrect inputs, identifies alternatives, determines the proximity between the potentially incorrect input and the alternative, and computes probabilities of possible correct “word” based on the proximity measurement and optionally on a context of the possible conversion. Then it determines the most likely conversion from all the possible conversions.

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“Fault-Tolerant Romanized Input Method for Non-Roman Characters,” Wu et. al. (U.S.

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IBM Patent Application: Customized Client-Side Search Indexing of the Web

ibmclientsideindexpatapp.jpgA recently published application shows IBM seeking a patent on a client-side search indexing program that works in conjunction with a server based search index to provide a users with personalized search results. Search result personalization is a long sought after goal. Google personalized search attempts to provided user customized results by retaining user data on the server-side. However, others have sought client side solutions. Jaime Teevan, et al.’s article “Personalizing Search via Automated Analysis of Interests and Activities” demonstrates that personalized client-side algorithms can significantly improve on current Web search results. Demand for improved search methods will increase with the ever expanding amounts of data.…

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How to Admit or Exclude Prelimary Breathalyzer Results

IBJFeb08CoverThe February issue of the Illinois Bar Journal carries my article on “How to Admit or Exclude PBT Results” [Subscription Req.] [1]. PBTs are preliminary breath tests that are typically administered by the police on the scene of a traffic stop. The police use the results of a PBT as a factor to help establish probable cause to arrest a driver for driving under the influence of alcohol. PBTs are different and less reliable than the breath tests typically given at the police station—a.k.a. chemical tests—and therefore PBT results are treated differently than chemical test results. The article explains (1) when PBT results are admissible in court, (2) when the State is required to lay a foundation for their admission, and (3) what constitutes an adequate foundation.

This …

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3D Printing and the Future of Innovation

Guy Kawasaki pointed me to this video of Chris Anderson talking about the topic of his next book–"the emerging world of free." His discussion of 3D printing technology got me thinking about how it might create a new class of inventors and innovation.

3D Printing in the World of Free. At 14:57 in the video, Chris states that 3D printing technology is introducing aspects of free into the world of physical products. He says 3D printing makes complexity free. Traditionally every bit of complexity in an item added more cost. However, every additional level of detail and complexity–i.e. grove in the surface–in a 3D printed item is free. The additional complexity cost nothing; the 3D printer head just takes a different path to make the detail required.

Chris …

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Suburban Networking: Silicon Prairie Social

img1Tonight, the first Silicon Prairie Social was held at Mullen’s Bar and Grill in Lisle, Illinois. Similar to the Tech Cocktail events in Chicago, the Silicon Prairie Social was designed to connect “tech professionals, entrepreneurs, service providers, Internet professionals, Web 2.0 and startup companies, the mobile industry, and mobile marketing professionals.” The goals of the event were to:

  • Connect local people with others in their industry and build community
  • Raise the profile of the Silicon Prairie through the publicity generated around the events.
  • Foster investment and economic development in the region by showcasing local businesses, entrepreneurs, and startups.

Here’s a partial list of those I saw, met, or talked with:

  • Brian Clark of XNet an Internet hosting and services company in Lisle
  • Jeff Mitchell of Harvey Nash an IT services
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